Tag Archives: Dr. Jasmine Bookert

Hidden Gems: Meet Dr. Jasmine Bookert

Hidden Gems: Meet Dr. Jasmine Bookert

Hidden Gems: Meet Dr. Jasmine Bookert

 

                                                                                                              Hidden Gems – Voyage Houston Magazine

                                                                                                                Meet Dr. Jasmine Bookert

                                                                                                                               July 20, 2021

 

 

Introduction

Today we’d like to introduce you to Dr. Jasmine Bookert.

 

Alright, so thank you so much for sharing your story and insight with our readers. To kick things off, can you tell us a bit about how you got started?

 

I am a board-certified emergency medicine physician. I attended medical school at Howard University College of Medicine and did residency training at the LSU- New Orleans Emergency Medicine Program. After finishing my training, I moved back to Houston, my hometown. I have worked all around the Houston metropolitan area. During Covid, I realized that medicine was changing. Not only did patients want more options than going into a medical office or hospital, but they also wanted to receive compassionate care and care that is free from bias. 

 

Evaluating patients in person is not the only way to efficiently practice medicine. Of course, I knew about telemedicine and even considered working for another company in the past, but during the pandemic, I realized that there was still a need for more telemedicine companies.

 

My purpose for starting Dr. Diagnosis was to add to the diversity in the telemedicine world. When I looked at various telemedicine sites, often the providers or physicians available did not look like me. I am a black female physician. I am a part of the 2% of physicians in the United States that are black and female. People, especially women, are searching for women doctors and someone they can relate to. My staff is diverse. We have trained and worked in diverse areas. We truly want to help our patients and make them feel comfortable while receiving excellent medical care. We want to enable patients to be evaluated adequately without bias.

 

The end goal for my company is to partner with HBCUs- Historically Black Colleges and Universities, so that students on these campuses will receive excellent medical care and not have to leave campus to go to an emergency room or urgent care for simple ailments.

 

I also hope to partner with programs that focus on underserved areas, single-parent households, and elderly patients. These patients often have financial issues but also have transportation issues, are unable to take off work, or cannot afford childcare to take care of their own medical needs. I don’t just want to have a company, but I want to make an impact in medicine and in my community

Alright, so let’s dig a little deeper into the story – has it been an easy path overall, and if not, what were the challenges you’ve had to overcome?

 

The journey to becoming an entrepreneur, especially during the pandemic, was not easy. Before becoming a physician, I was a student. My only previous work experience was as a lab assistant at a medical clinic. I do not have a business background. So initially, the process of just filling out the paperwork and deciding what type of company to start was overwhelming.

 

Also, I am married with four kids and still have a full-time job as an emergency medicine physician, so I have had to create a new balance in my life. Thankfully, I have family, friends, and colleagues that we’re able to assist me with the start-up process. 


And as with any new business, there have been ups and downs, but I think it is key to realize that growing a new business is not a sprint but a marathon. And I am all in on this journey.

 

Thanks for sharing that. So, maybe next you can tell us a bit more about your work?


Dr. Diagnosis is a telemedicine urgent care. So we are evaluating patients through video consultations. You can use your phone, tablet, or computer to access us. Currently, we are seeing patients in Texas and Louisiana, but soon will be expanding across the south and more. We can treat simple, non-life-threatening complaints or disorders such as mild Covid-19 symptoms, urinary tract infections, sinus infections, allergies, flu symptoms, toothaches, gout, etc. The list goes on and on. We are available on your lunch break, in between classes, late at night, and before your doctor’s office opens in the morning.


At Dr. Diagnosis we provide excellent medical care at affordable pricing. We believe everyone deserves to have access to medical care and Dr. Diagnosis can provide those services. Our providers at Dr. Diagnosis can also refer patients to appropriate follow-up specialists if needed. We strive to provide our patients with our motto, which is the 3 C’s: Comfort, Convenience, and Comprehensive. Our providers offer a personal touch that you will not always receive from other telemedicine companies.


Lastly, our branding is Diagnose Me Now because our goal is to give patients the diagnosis now. We also are focused on mental health and wellness. Dr. Diagnosis wants to help you physically and emotionally. I have a podcast and a blog called The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis that provides medical education, as well as mental health and wellness information to our patients. 


Patients learn valuable contact information for specialists and providers in all areas of medicine, including therapy and wellness. Dr. Diagnosis is not just a business. It is the future of medicine with diverse and relatable physicians that want to improve all aspects of your healthcare.

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We’d love to hear about how you think about risk taking?

 


I am not usually a risk-taker, so starting a new business during all the changes going on in the world was nerve-racking. During the pandemic, many physicians like myself had a decrease in hours, salaries or lost their jobs. Becoming an entrepreneur is an investment in my own future. 

 

This company is something that I can help grow and develop. Dr. Diagnosis will allow me to directly foster community relationships that are important to my values.

 

In taking this risk, I began taking more risks. I’m usually behind the scenes in my world, but now I’m hosting a podcast and writing a blog that provides insight to some of my most personal medical experiences. 

 

One thing I have learned over this past year is that you usually have to take some risks to grow and prosper. So I guess now I am a bit of a risk-taker!

Pricing


  • $49.99 6 am to 10 pm
  • $59.99 10 pm to 6 am
  • $49.99 Day & Night for 65 and older

Contact Info

 

  • Email: drdiagnosis@diagnosemenow.com
  • Website: www.diagnosemenow.com
  • Instagram: instagram.com/diagnosemenow
  • Facebook: facebook.com/Diagnosemenow
  • Twitter: twitter.com/diagnosemenow
  • Youtube: http://youtube.com/channel/UCOhbq8uM5ePQijFIfTwS1kg
  • Other: https://the-breakdown-with-dr-diagnosis.simplecast.com

  

 

It should be It’s All in Your Head

Introduction

 

                                                                                                                                   It’s All In Your Head

  May 25, 2021

 

 

 

 Hey everyone. I’m Dr. Jazz and I have a new topic to share with you guys.  Headaches are a major reason for medical visits across the world, and can significantly affect the daily lives of those dealing with chronic headaches.  But before we dive deeper into that let me give my disclaimer. This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is for educational and informational purposes. If you have medical concerns or need medical advice, please consult your physician for appropriate evaluation and treatment.  Now back to headaches. In this post I will reveal my own personal journey with headaches, and discuss various types of headaches and treatments. 

 
 

My Headache Story

I’ve had headaches since the age of about 10 or 11 years old. At that time, I had some type of work up. I definitely remember having a cat scan of my brain.  As I became a teenager and went to college, I used Imitrex for my acute headaches which at that time were diagnosed as classic migraine headaches. Throbbing pain to one side of my head, light sensitivity, and nausea.  Everyone that knew me well was aware that if I had a headache, I would spend at least a day or so sleeping in a quiet room trying to “sleep off” the headache.  For a short period of time, I took amitriptyline as a preventative measure for my headaches. I didn’t think that medication worked that well so I eventually just stopped taking it. Then I got busy with medical school and residency, but still had headaches. My last year of residency I was diagnosed with a pituitary tumor. It was concerning because the tumor was bleeding (hemorrhagic) and was close to my optic nerve (vision).  The lead up to the surgery was extremely nerve wracking. All I could think of was that I’m finally finishing up all these years of training and did not want to have my vision affected. That whole experience is a whole other blog post. Whether it was related or just psychological, for a few years after the surgery, I felt that my headaches improved.  Then while dealing with work, family, and just life, the headaches became almost daily again.

 

So, now I felt like I was dealing with multiple types of headaches- migraines, tension headaches, and medication over use headaches. I took over the counter medications all the time. I used menthol rub because my neck muscles and my temples would be extremely tight and sore. And I still had migraines too. These are the three type of headaches I want to breakdown in this post. There are so many other types of headaches but these three are very common. 

 

 

Common Headaches

Migraines are headaches that can have a hereditary component. My grandmother had migraines. Migraines can be with or without an aura. Aura is like a warning sign that the migraine is coming. Patients may have visual disturbances or some neurological symptoms. Then the headache begins. Classic migraine headaches are usually one sided and have severe throbbing, nausea, vomiting, light sensitivity, sound sensitivity, and possible neurological symptoms (complex migraines).  There are several different categories of migraines and phases of a migraine headache (prodrome, aura, headache, postdrome). Patients can develop chronic migraines – migraines occurring at least 15 days out of the month. Unfortunately, for some, migraine headaches can last for days at a time. Treatment is geared toward preventive and acute treatment, and to improve quality of life. Medications used include Triptans, Calcium Channel blockers, Beta Blockers, Anti-depressants, CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) monoclonal antibodies, and over the counter medications, such as Excedrin Migraine. Botox is also an option for headaches that are refractory to oral medications and other treatments. 

 

Tension headaches are the most common type of headaches. They are dull like in nature, and patients describe tightness of the scalp and neck which feels almost vise like or like a tight band around the head. Tension headaches and migraine headaches can have overlapping symptoms like being one sided, light sensitivity, and nausea or vomiting.  Tension headaches can be chronic as well and significantly affect daily activities. This can be confusing to differentiate. Treatment may be more geared towards relaxation (sleep, massage), decreasing stress, biofeedback techniques, using ice or heat to relax the muscles, and sometimes oral medications like anti-depressants or over the counter medications like ibuprofen or naproxen. 

 

Lastly, there is a category called medication overuse headaches. This type of headache was previously known as rebound headaches. This is a difficult one because people with headaches take medication to relieve the pain. Sometimes we can get into a cycle of taking medication and then the headache comes right back in a few hours or the next day when the medication wears off.  Then we take more medication. You may have this type of headache if you wake up with a headache or have headaches almost daily. If you are taking medication more than twice or three times a week, have to increase the dosage of medication you are taking (often over the counter), and have frequent headaches you might be in this headache pattern. To wean yourself from the medications, keep a headache diary, seek evaluation from a neurologist to get better control of your headaches, and make lifestyle changes (hydration, sleep, avoid headache triggers, exercise, stop smoking, etc.). 

 

Now as I stated previously, this is a tiny segment of the types of headaches that can be diagnosed. There are over 150 types of headaches, which is why it is important to be evaluated for your headaches, especially if persistent. You can definitely see your primary care physician, but a neurologist is the specialist that evaluates and treats headaches. Please don’t suffer in silence or self- diagnose. I hope this post has shed some light on the world of headaches.

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

If you want to give some feedback to the blog or if you have suggestions for a new topic to discuss, drop me an email. You can email me at drdiagnosis@diagnosemenow.com, and follow my social media pages for my podcast on Instagram and Facebook, @thebreakdownwithdrdiagnosis. There you can find the link to my podcast website and subscribe to the podcast. I talk about this same topic with a board certified neurologist on my podcast.  And remember, go check out my telemedicine company, Dr. Diagnosis.  Follow Dr. Diagnosis on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, @diagnosemenow to stay updated on medical information and our events. And even if you don’t need to see a provider at Dr. Diagnosis, please check out the website at www.diagnosemenow.com. We have plenty of resources and links about COVID-19, influenza, mental health, and other topics. Until next time, stay safe and keep you and your loved ones healthy. See you soon!


 

 
 

Up and Down

Introduction

Up and Down

 

                                                                                                                       Up and Down
                                                                                                                       May 23, 2021

 

 

Hey Everyone!  I’m Dr. Jasmine Bookert aka Dr. Jazz.  This blog covers an important and serious aspect of medicine, which is mental health. Specifically, anxiety and depression. But before we get into the blog let me say that this blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is for educational and informational purposes. If you have medical concerns or need medical advice, please consult your physician for appropriate evaluation and treatment.  So, now back to this post.

 

Anxiety & Its Symptoms

Anxiety

 

Most people experience anxiety at some point in their life.  Anxiety is a natural response to various situations, such as public speaking, job interview, surgery, or taking a test. I know I was always anxious before tests in medical school.  I’m the same way when flying or when I have to have a dental procedure done.  The dentist anxiety is a new one for me! But otherwise, I don’t have excessive worry throughout my day. It is very situational. Anxiety becomes an issue when it is no longer occasional and affects your normal daily activities. General anxiety disorder is when you have excessive anxiety for at least 6 months. Let’s review anxiety symptoms. 

 

Anxiety Symptoms

*Difficulty concentrating

*Irritability

*Sleep Issues

*Fatigue

*Restlessness

*Constant worry

*Tension

 

People with anxiety may suffer from a panic disorder, or have panic attacks.  During a panic attack people may having racing or pounding heartbeat, shaking, shortness of breath, chest pain, sweating, and a sense of doom.  These are the patients I mostly see in the emergency department. Sometimes these patients require medication and sometimes these patients just need reassurance. In the outpatient setting psychotherapy is a main treatment for anxiety.  Basically, talking to a therapist. An example is cognitive behavioral therapy, which helps people change their behavior, thinking, and reactions to anxiety provoking situations. Medication may be needed such as benzodiazepines, anti-depressants, or other types of medications. Medication is directed specifically for that patient and what is needed to help with anxiety.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depression & Its Symptoms

Depression

 

Now let’s discuss depression. Major depressive disorder is serious. There are different types of depression.  Many people are familiar with postpartum depression- which is major depression during pregnancy or after delivery. It can make it difficult for these mothers to take care of the baby or do normal daily activities. There is also persistent depressive disorder, and so many other types of depression. It is important to be evaluated so that a professional can determine what type of depression you may be experiencing. 

 

Depression Symptoms

*Hopelessness

*Irritability

*Persistent sadness

*Anxiety

*Loss of Interest in activities

*Fatigue

*Restlessness

*Difficulty concentrating

*Decreased appetite

*Losing weight

* Hopelessness, Guilt, Worthlessness

*Suicidal thoughts or attempts

 

 

This list does not encompass all symptoms. And all patients with depression don’t have all these symptoms. It is very important to recognize when depression has become life threatening. These patients may need inpatient treatment.  Mainstays of treatment are antidepressants and psychotherapy. Some patients with severe depression that is refractory to other treatments may need ECT or electroconvulsive disorder.  As with anxiety, the type of treatment is determined by a professional. 

 

An important part of mental health can be self-care. It is important to take care of yourself.  Eat healthy, get an adequate amount of sleep, and decrease unnecessary stimulants. Exercise (yoga, walking) and relaxation techniques (breathing exercises, meditation) can help patients with anxiety and depression. Self-care is often forgotten but is an important part of improving symptoms. So, if you or someone you know is suffering from anxiety or depression or any form of mental health, please reach out to a mental health professional. There are many resources and hotlines available such as:

 

www.mhanational.org  or 800-273-TALK

www.samhsa.gov   or   800-662-HELP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

I hope this post gives you guys a better understanding of mental health, specifically anxiety and depression.  During this pandemic both disorders have risen to become even more of a crisis. Let’s help one another. Be aware and be proactive. If you want to give some feedback on the blog or if you have suggestions for a new topic to discuss, drop me an email. You can email me at drdiagnosis@diagnosemenow.com, and follow my social media pages for my podcast on Instagram and Facebook, @thebreakdownwithdrdiagnosis. There you can find the link to my podcast website and subscribe to the podcast. I would love for you to check in with me and my guests regularly to get the breakdown on a new diagnosis every episode. And remember, go check out the telemedicine company, Dr. Diagnosis. Please follow Dr. Diagnosis on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, @diagnosemenow. And even if you don’t need to see a provider at Dr. Diagnosis, please check out the website at www.diagnosemenow.com. We have plenty of resources and links about COVID-19, influenza, mental health, and other topics. Until next time, stay safe and keep you and your loved ones healthy. See you soon!

 

Source

www.nimh.nih.gov

 
 
Will it grow back?

Will it grow back?

Introduction

Will it grow back?

 

                                                                                                                  Will It Grow Back?
                                                                                                                      April 22, 2021

 

 

 

Hey everyone. I’m Dr. Jazz and I have a new blog post to share.  Hair loss can be devastating. Our hair is our crown… literally.  Without it we may feel inadequate.  There are so many reasons for hair loss, but before we dive deeper into that let me give my disclaimer. This blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is for educational and informational purposes. If you have medical concerns or need medical advice, please consult your physician for appropriate evaluation and treatment.  Now back to hair loss. 

 

I have personally had a long journey with hair loss.  To my recollection my hair loss story began with my first pregnancy.  After I gave birth to my daughter, I noticed a lot of shedding and thinning of my hair.  But people reassured me that this was common post pregnancy and that my hair would grow back.  So, my hair did improve some after delivery but I definitely had thinner areas of my hair.  So, I tried different hairstyles that would let my hair “rest” and hopefully grow.  I did this for years with mild improvement. But then I was pregnant again, with twins. After delivery my hair didn’t seem too much worse but then in the postpartum months, I had some thinning again.  I did the same things as before. Never went to the doctor. So now I’m 7 years into dealing with my thinning hair and finally it was becoming very obvious. So, I went to a dermatologist and started some treatment. So moral of the story is, if your hair matters to you, seek medical care sooner than later. 

 
 

Types of Hair Loss

Now let’s talk about types of hair loss.  I’m just going to talk about two types of hair loss. First there is androgenic alopecia which is the most common cause of hair loss in the world.  Basically, this is male or female pattern baldness. This means you have inherited genes that cause your hair follicles to shrink and stop growing. This can occur as early as in your teenage years. But there is treatment, and regrowth can occur. Then there is scarring alopecia (cicatricial alopecia) which means there is inflammation that destroys the hair follicles.  Unfortunately, once this happens those follicles cannot grow back.  This type of hair loss needs to be treated ASAP so that the inflammation will not spread and cause further permanent hair loss. Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia is most common in Black women or those of African descent. 

 

 

 

 

 

Signs of hair loss

*Thinning of hair

*Bald or smooth spots on scalp

*Receding Hair Line

*Widening part

*Thinner ponytail

 

Dermatologists will examine your scalp to help determine the type of hair loss. Sometimes a physical exam is all that is needed to make a diagnosis.  Sometimes blood tests are done to see if the hair loss is related to a medical illness like thyroid disease.  A biopsy may be done if concern for inflammation and scaring.Once the diagnosis is made then a treatment plan can be developed.

 

 

 

 

 

Hair loss Treatment

For androgenic alopecia, common treatments are minoxidil (prescribed or over the counter) and, at home laser treatments, which are laser caps or combs that help promote hair regrowth.  Also, PRP or platelet-rich plasma (your own plasma)  can be injected into the scalp to stimulate hair growth. Lastly, sometimes oral medications are used to treat this type of hair loss. The key to all of these treatments is that if you stop doing them the hair loss returns. So, treatment can be lifelong or at least until you don’t care anymore! 

 

For scarring alopecia, the treatment is different. The idea is not to have regrowth because those follicles are permanently damaged, but to prevent anymore scarring of the scalp. These treatments may include anti-inflammatory medications such as topical or injected steroids, antibiotics, antifungals, and other systemic medications that are trying to reduce the inflammation in the scalp.  If the patient has at least a year of no inflammation or hair loss then hair transplantation is an option. A pricey option but it is available. 

 

There are other types of hair loss so this is not all encompassing.  If you are experiencing hair loss, please seek treatment. Of course, if you are postpartum, just had a major illness, if you have had significant weight loss, are receiving chemotherapy treatment, taking medications that may cause hair loss, put a lot of stress on your hair by doing certain or repetitive styles, or YOU are under stress, your hair loss may not be permanent or require acute treatment. But let a professional decide. I wish I had sought out treatment sooner, but better late than never. Be proactive and save your crown! 

Conclusion

If you want to give some feedback on the blog or if you have suggestions for a new topic to discuss, drop me an email. You can email me at drdiagnosis@diagnosemenow.com, and follow my social media pages for my podcast on Instagram and Facebook, @thebreakdownwithdrdiagnosis. There you can find the link to my podcast website and subscribe to the podcast. I would love for you to check in with me and my guests regularly to get the breakdown on a new diagnosis every episode. And remember, go check out the telemedicine company, Dr. Diagnosis. Please follow Dr. Diagnosis on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, @diagnosemenow. And even if you don’t need to see a provider at Dr. Diagnosis, please check out the website at www.diagnosemenow.com. We have plenty of resources and links about COVID-19, influenza, mental health, and other topics. Until next time, stay safe and keep you and your loved ones healthy. See you soon!

 

Source

https://www.aad.org/

https://www.freepik.com/photos/people


 

 
 

There’s A problem Down There – Part 2

Introduction

 

                                                                                                 There’s  A Problem Down There – Part 2
                                                                                                                      April 14, 2021

 

 

 Hey Everyone!  I’m Dr. Jasmine Bookert aka Dr. Jazz.  So, this is part two of There’s a Problem Down There. Sexually Transmitted Infections can be serious, and can have long lasting effects. But before we get into the blog let me say that this blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is for educational and informational purposes. If you have medical concerns or need medical advice, please consult your physician for appropriate evaluation and treatment.  So, now back to this post.

 

Sexually transmitted infections

In this post I will abbreviate sexually transmitted infections as STIs. Now let’s go over three different STIs that may cause a discharge.  Frequently these three STIs do not cause a discharge which is why you may not know you have an infection. Due to the possibility of having an asymptomatic infection, using protection and having regular evaluations for STIs is important. I frequently test for all three in the emergency department.

 

Trichomoniasis

 

First up is Trichomoniasis. This STI is caused by Trichomonas Vaginalis, which is a protozoan parasite. Often patients will be asymptomatic.  Infection is more common in women than men.  It is the most common curable STI.  Signs and symptoms can be itching or irritation in the genitals, burning with urination, and vaginal or penile discharge. Trichomoniasis can lead to preterm labor in pregnancy.  Treatment is metronidazole or tinidazole which are taken orally.  To avoid reinfection, all sexual partners need to be treated. It is also important to get tested after treatment to make sure the infection is resolved. 

 

Gonorrhea.

 

Next, is Gonorrhea. Most people have at least heard of gonorrhea. It is another common STI that can cause infection in the genitals, rectum, and throat.  If you are sexually active, especially if with multiple partners, or high risk partners, you should get tested yearly at a minimum.  Women are often asymptomatic, but can have pain with urination, vaginal discharge, or irregular vaginal bleeding. Untreated, this can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) which can cause serious complications. Men may have burning with urination, penile discharge, and pain or swelling in the testicles. There are also specific symptoms if there is an anal or throat infection. Gonorrhea can be transmitted to an infant during delivery which is why it is important to have screenings during pregnancy. Testing can be done with a urine test or by swabbing the area of infection. Treatment includes antibiotics, usually intramuscular ceftriaxone. 

 

Chlamydia

 

Last, is Chlamydia.  Chlamydia can be spread by vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Occurs in men and women. Symptoms are similar to the other STIs: genital discharge and burning with urination.  If there is an anal infection, a patient may have rectal bleeding, discharge, or pain.  Chlamydia may lead to preterm labor or cause infection in newborns.  Testing is the same as for gonorrhea- urine or swab. PID is a complication with this infection as well, which can affect fertility or cause chronic pelvic pain. Due to increased resistance to azithromycin (one time dose antibiotic for chlamydia), now the most recent recommendation is to use doxycycline, which is taken orally twice daily for 7 days. At one time it was almost standard to treat gonorrhea and chlamydia together, hence the term GC, but now it is recommended to just treat each one independently, unless there is definitive reason to treat both. 

 

So key things to remember about these three STIs:

 

1. They are treatable.

2. May or may not have symptoms

3. Should be screened at least yearly if risk warrants

4. There may be co-infections

5. Affect pregnancy

6. Increase risk of contracting HIV

 

 

 

Conclusion

So that is the quick rundown on trichomoniasis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. The most important take away is to practice safe sex and get tested.  If you want to give some feedback on the blog or if you have suggestions for a new topic to discuss, drop me an email. You can email me at drdiagnosis@diagnosemenow.com, and follow my social media pages for my podcast on Instagram and Facebook, @thebreakdownwithdrdiagnosis. There you can find the link to my podcast website and subscribe to the podcast. I would love for you to check in with me and my guests regularly to get the breakdown on a new diagnosis every episode. And remember, go check out the telemedicine company, Dr. Diagnosis. Please follow Dr. Diagnosis on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, @diagnosemenow. And even if you don’t need to see a provider at Dr. Diagnosis, please check out the website at www.diagnosemenow.com. We have plenty of resources and links about COVID-19, influenza, mental health, and other topics. Until next time, stay safe and keep you and your loved ones healthy. See you soon!


Sources

 

https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/trichomoniasis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/std/gonorrhea/

https://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/

 

 

 

 
 
The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis

There’s A problem Down There – Part 1

Introduction

The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis

 

                                                                                                 There’s  A Problem Down There – Part 1
                                                                                                                      April 8, 2021

 

 

Hey Everyone!  I’m Dr. Jasmine Bookert aka Dr. Jazz.  Today’s topic may be a sensitive one for some, but we are going to tackle it.  But before we get into the blog let me say that this blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is for educational and informational purposes. If you have medical concerns or need medical advice, please consult your physician for appropriate evaluation and treatment. So, now back to this post. The topic today is vaginal discharge. Vaginal discharge can be an uncomfortable thing to discuss. No one wants to sit around the dinner table talking about their vaginal discharge. But it is a common concern for many women.   

 

First, let me clarify that not all vaginal discharge is abnormal.  Women can have a normal discharge. It may change depending on hormones or different situations but it is not always abnormal.  Women may notice increased discharge close to ovulation or post menstrual cycle.   But then there are other causes of vaginal discharge that need treatment.  Bacterial vaginosis and Candidiasis or Yeast infections are two common reasons for abnormal vaginal discharge. 

 

 

Bacterial Vaginosis occurs when there is too much of a type of bacteria in the vagina. When this happens there is disruption of the normal balance of bacteria in the vagina. An imbalance of “good” and “bad” bacteria is how it is often described. BV as we in the medical field call this condition is the most common vaginal condition diagnosed in women 15 to 44.   Common causes of BV include a new sex partner, multiple sex partners, or douching.  All of these activities can alter the balance of bacteria in the vagina, leading to bacterial vaginosis. BV is not a sexually transmitted infection but bacterial vaginosis can increase your chances of contracting a sexually transmitted infection.  So here is a quick summary of symptoms and treatment:

 

Symptoms & Treatment Options

 Symptoms:

• Thin white or gray vaginal discharge

• Pain, itching, or burning in the vagina

• Fish-like odor, increased after sex

• Burning with urination

• External vaginal itching

 

Diagnosis: Clinical diagnosis or laboratory testing from vaginal swab

 

Treatment Options: Oral Flagyl (Metronidazole) or Metronidazole gel (intravaginally) or Clindamycin (intravaginally or orally) or Tinidazole. No alcohol when taking the -zoles! Recurrent BV is common and may require repeat treatment or a specifically designed regimen recommended by your physician. 

 

So,the next time you have BV, know that it is very common. Most of your friends have probably had it at least once. You do not have to avoid sex because of BV, but do know that a new partner or having multiple partners may be the cause. Probiotics may help to keep the normal bacteria balance in your vagina. I take them for this very reason.   

 

Now, the breakdown on yeast infections or candidiasis. Candidiasis is caused by yeast, which is a type a fungus. It is the second most commonly diagnosed vaginal infection after bacterial vaginosis. I definitely can relate to how irritating and uncomfortable a yeast infection can be. I’ve had one bad yeast infection. I think I was pregnant at the time and miserable. There are various reasons as to why yeast develops in the vagina. But first, let’s discuss symptoms. Many of you already know these symptoms unfortunately.

 

Candidiasis (Yeast) Symptoms:

Symptoms:

 

• Vaginal itchiness or pain -redness, swelling, or irritation of the walls of the vagina

• Pain with sex

• Pain or burning with urination

• Abnormal vaginal discharge- thick like cottage cheese (sorry)

 

Risk factors:

• Immunocompromised-weakened immune system

• Diabetes- yeast likes sugar

• Pregnancy- the hormones

• Medications- antibiotics, oral contraceptives

 

Diagnosis: vaginal swab to test for the yeast(fungus)

 

Treatment: antifungal medication intravaginally (more zoles) or oral fluconazole

 

Prevention Tips:

• Wearing cotton underwear

• Not wearing wet clothing for long periods of time (change your workout clothes)

• Loose clothing

• Controlling health problems that increase risk (diabetes)

• No douching 

• Be careful of scented feminine products or soaps

• Change tampons and pads frequently

• Only take antibiotics when necessary

Conclusion

So that is the break down on common reasons for vaginal discharge. Remember, don’t self-diagnose based on something you read. Seek treatment from a medical provider to be properly diagnosed. If you want to provide some feedback on this blog, or if you have suggestions for a new topic to discuss drop me an email at drdiagnosis@diagnosemenow.com. Please take the time and follow my social media pages for my podcast on Instagram and Facebook, @thebreakdownwithdrdiagnosis. There you can find the link to my podcast website and subscribe to the podcast. I would love for you to check in with me and my guests regularly to get the breakdown on a new diagnosis each episode. And remember, check out Dr. Diagnosis, a telemedicine urgent care. Please follow Dr. Diagnosis on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, @diagnosemenow. And even if you don’t need to see a provider at Dr. Diagnosis, just check out the website at www.diagnosemenow.com. We have plenty of resources and links about COVID-19, influenza, mental health, and other topics. Until next time, stay safe and keep you and your loved ones healthy. See you soon!

 

Sources

1. https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/bv.htmhave

2. https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/candidiasis/genital/

 
 
The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis

Don’t Miss Your Shot. 

The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis

The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis

 

                                                                                                               Don’t Miss Your Shot
                                                                                                                      March 30, 2021

 

Hey everyone! I’m Dr. Jasmine Bookert aka Dr. Jazz.  Can you guess what I’m going to talk about in this post? Yes, you guessed correctly. Covid- 19 vaccines! But before we get into the blog let me say that this blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is for educational and informational purposes. If you have medical concerns or need medical advice, please consult a physician for appropriate evaluation and treatment. Now back to these Covid-19 vaccines. Have you gotten your vaccine yet? I have. So, I’m going to share my experience receiving one of the Covid-19 vaccines and some facts about the vaccines. So, let’s jump right in so you can go sign up!

 

First, let me begin by acknowledging that it is normal to have some uncertainty or even fears regarding these vaccines.  Since the beginning of the pandemic, we have experienced new and unknown situations, such as wearing a mask all the time, social distancing, virtual learning or working, and not seeing our loved ones. Now the scientists and the medical community want you to get a new vaccine. Well, yes, we do. We don’t want to keep living like we are in an alternative universe. We don’t want to live in fear of catching or spreading the virus. Life will never go back to our old normal but we want to create a new normal that is safe for all of us. 

Here are a few facts about the vaccines

Dr. Jasmine Bookert

.You will not get Covid from the vaccines.  You may experience an immune response (all those good antibodies) which can make you feel sick, but you will not get Covid-19 from any vaccine.

 

2. Moderna and Pfizer are mRNA vaccines. They will not alter or mutate your DNA. You will not grow an extra toe. They just don’t work that way.  

 

3. Johnson & Johnson uses a viral vector technology. Different mechanism but still creates those wonderful antibodies to fight against a Covid-19 infection. 

 

4. If you have had Covid-19 you will still benefit from being vaccinated.  It is possible to have some immunity for maybe up to 90 days after a Covid-19 infection but there is no lifelong immunity. You should still get the vaccine whenever deemed appropriate by your physician. 

 

5. Moderna and Pfizer are two shot regimens (28 days and 21 days apart respectively). Johnson & Johnson is one shot. Take which ever one is available. No cherry picking!

 

6. Allergic Reactions may occur just like with every other vaccine.  If you have a history of severe allergic reactions to vaccines or medications you need to evaluate your risk with your physician. 

 

7. There is no microchip in the vaccine. I even heard two ladies saying this while waiting to get my mammogram. So, I repeat. There is no microchip in the vaccine. Nothing else to say on that one.

 

So back to my personal experience. The Pfizer vaccine was available to me in early December since I’m an emergency medicine physician.  I had to wait for the first shot due to an illness. It was not Covid, but I was advised by my physician to wait until cleared of all infection.  Sometimes us doctors do listen as patients. I received my first Pfizer shot on January 15, 2021.  After my first shot I had some arm soreness and felt achy. I was tired that night. No fever or major side effects. Second shot was Feb 5, 2021.  This time I had headache and body aches that same night.  Felt kind of blah. Still had the same symptoms the next day, but did my normal activities.  By Sunday I felt pretty much back to normal. Now, my parents received Moderna and both only had arm soreness. Nothing else. They are both 73 years old and didn’t miss a beat. Moral of the story is I didn’t feel horrible, and months later I have no concerns about the vaccine.

 

Why is it important to get vaccinated?

Well three reasons:

 

1. Protect Yourself.

2. Protects others around you.

3. Stop the pandemic.

 

It really is that simple. As health care providers we don’t want to see people extremely ill or dying from a disease that now may be preventable, or at least not cause such severe symptoms.  Please call your physician, check your local designated vaccine sites, and some of the smaller clinics as well, to get signed up for one of the vaccines. The criteria for getting vaccinated is becoming less restricted and the vaccines are becoming more readily available. I know some of you guys have been anxiously waiting to get the vaccine.  Continue to be patient and diligent.  Keep up the social distancing. You have come too far to not maintain! Encourage your family members, friends, and neighbors to get their vaccines. I truly believe these vaccines are necessary to stop the pandemic. Be a team player and don’t miss your shot. Our lives and well-being depend on it!

 

Conclusion

 

So, you get the idea. Get vaccinated.  If you enjoyed this post or want to give some feedback on this blog, drop me an email. Or if you have suggestions for a new topic to discuss, do the same. You can email me at drdiagnosis@diagnosemenow.com, and follow my social media pages for my podcast on Instagram and Facebook, @thebreakdownwithdrdiagnosis. There you can find the link to my podcast website and subscribe to the podcast. I would love for you to check in with me and my guests regularly to get the breakdown on a new diagnosis every episode. And remember, go check out my new telemedicine company, Dr. Diagnosis. Please follow Dr. Diagnosis on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, @diagnosemenow. And even if you don’t need to see a provider at Dr. Diagnosis, please check out the website for the telemedicine company, at www.diagnosemenow.com. We have plenty of resources and links about COVID-19, influenza, mental health, and other topics. Until next time, stay safe and keep you and your loved ones healthy. See you soon!

 
The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis –

The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis

The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis

The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis

                                                                                                            Welcome to The Breakdown                                                                                                                       March 26,2021

 

Hey everyone. This is Dr. Jasmine B. Bookert, aka Dr. Jazz, sending good vibes from Houston, Texas. I want to give you a little insight into my blog called The Breakdown with Dr. Diagnosis. But before we get into the blog let me say that this blog is NOT medical advice. This blog is for educational and informational purposes. If you have medical concerns or need medical advice please consult a physician for appropriate evaluation and treatment. Now, let’s get into this blog!

 

Have you ever been to the doctor and you leave even more confused about your diagnosis or treatment? I think everyone has, including myself. Are you tired of taking medication and not knowing why? Do you want a more complete understanding of your diagnosis? Well, these questions gave me the idea for this blog. The Breakdown will cover some of the most common diagnoses, from start of finish. We will dive deep into the world of diagnosis which includes explaining the symptoms, how we diagnose, procedures, treatment plans, follow up, and dealing with the mental health aspect of being diagnosed. This blog will also provide information on wellness and preventive medicine so that you can cut back before getting cut by the surgeon’s scalpel!

Who Is Dr. Jazz?

DR. Jasmine Bookert

So here is the breakdown on me.  I am a board certified Emergency Medicine physician.  I’m also a proud graduate of Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, D.C. Shout out to all the HBCUs! After graduating from Howard, I moved to do my residency. I completed my residency at the LSU-New Orleans Emergency Medicine program.

 

I loved the real city vibe of D.C., and getting an education on crab cakes from my Baltimore friends. New Orleans is where I fell in love with gumbo, beignets, Mardi Gras, festivals, and my favorite sports team, The Saints. Yes, I am a part of the Who Dat Nation. I also felt very fortunate to do my medical training in the recent months after Hurricane Katrina. Sometimes it felt like I was in another country. I treated gunshot victims in a MASH like unit in the old Lord & Taylor department store. Patients returned to the city super sick because they were without their medications for over a year or two. For a long time almost, every conversation began with “Well since Katrina……”. It was very rewarding and humbling all at the same time and the lessons learned were invaluable. New Orleans taught me well.  

 

Besides these wonderful two cities, I grew up in St. Louis and Houston. I have also lived in Albuquerque, NM and Toledo, OH. Each city has helped to mold me into the physician I am today. After completing a four year residency, I moved back to Houston to work and to get married! I have worked all across the city of Houston and the surrounding suburbs, from the inner city to the community emergency departments, to the free standings. So now, I am 10 plus years in the game, not counting medical school and residency. 

 

Besides being a doctor, I am a wife and a mother of four, including four year old twins. Add on church, community service, and just life, and you can see just how busy I am. And just to add a little more spice to my life, I am now the founder of a telemedicine company, aptly called Dr. Diagnosis. The company is called Dr. Diagnosis(www.diagnosemenow.com) because everyone wants the diagnosis right now, including me! At Dr. Diagnosis, the focus will be taking care of your simple medical problems, along with mental health, nutrition, and wellness. 

Why I Created The Breakdown ​

But back to the blog. The idea of The Breakdown really came from my personal story. Starting around the age of eight, I vividly remember the multiple heart attacks my grandfather endured. My grandfather, Will Anderson, was a simple man with only a third grade education. When he had his heart attacks, he was always in critical condition. My family and I would pretty much drop everything and drive the 12 hours to Caruthersville, Missouri, my mom’s hometown. My grandfather, nor most of my family, understood all the tests or procedures that were being done. Or all the medications my grandfather had to take even once he went home. During those visits, I would stay in the room with my grandfather at the hospital and just hold his hand to try to give him comfort. 

 

We all have family members that go through a medical crisis and the entire family is confused. I’m still that go to family member that tries to answer and alleviate all the confusion, but now of course, I have my medical education to rely on. My purpose for this blog is to truly help people understand and navigate the maze of healthcare and empower you guys with knowledge about a variety of diagnoses.

 

So, I hope you understand my idea for this blog a little better. Please send me your ideas for topics to discuss. I already have a list of topics that I think would be good to breakdown on this blog, but I definitely want to hear from you guys.  You can email me at drdiagnosis@diagnosemenow.com, and follow my social media pages for my podcast with the same name on Instagram and Facebook, @thebreakdownwithdrdiagnosisThere you can find the link to my podcast website and subscribe to the podcast. I would love for you to check in with me and my guests to get the breakdown on your diagnosis. And remember, I am launching my new telemedicine company, Dr. Diagnosis, in April. Please follow Dr. Diagnosis on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, @diagnosemenow. And even if you don’t need to see a provider at Dr. Diagnosis, please check out the website for the telemedicine company, at www.diagnosemenow.com. We have plenty of resources and links about COVID-19, influenza, mental health, and other topics. Until next time, stay safe and keep you and your loved ones healthy. See you soon!